Message From the President of the United States, Transmitting Information, Required by a Resolution of the House of Representatives, of December 24, 1818. James Monroe.

Message From the President of the United States, Transmitting Information, Required by a Resolution of the House of Representatives, of December 24, 1818

Washington City: Printed by E. De Krafft, 1819.

Wraps. Disbound wraps approx. 8.5" x 6". 7 pages, [1] page blank. Light toning to the contents. Contents of this brief communication cite James Monroe, J. C. Calhoun, and an "extract of a letter from Major C. Vandeventer, chief clerk, to major general Andrew Jackson, dated "Department of War, June 2d, 1818." The contents of page 7 read "Your letters of the 7th of April, one without date, from Fort Gadsden, and on the 26th of April, are received. "The President of the United States, and the Secretary of War, are out of town. The former will return about the 15th instant, the latter not before the middle of next month. So soon as the President returns, your dispatches, together with your order to Major Davis, commanding the arrest of captain Wright, and a copy of your letter to the governor of Georgia, in relation to the horrid and atrocious destruction of the Chehaw village, will be laid before him. In the mean time, I am advised to communicate the 'opinion,' that the trial of captain Wright, by court martial, is decidedly preferable to a civil prosecution in the federal court." Captain Wright and his Georgia Militia, from Twiggs and Jones County, attacked a friendly Creek village on the Flint River killing upwards from 5-50 members of the peaceful tribe (more source information can be found from the Georgia Historical Quarterly December 1965 article by Merton Coulter). Very good. Item #21276

From the Albany Herald - Accounts of the incident, now mostly lost to history or obscured by time, vary. But most agree that the treachery of Capt. Obed Wright cost the lives of at least seven men, one woman and two children, although Wright himself estimated that number to be as high as 50. “Wright reported that about 24 warriors were killed, and since some of the houses had their doors shut and guns were being fired from crevices, the buildings were fired and some of the inhabitants burned to death,” documents within the 2004 Southwest Georgia Archaeological Survey explain. “(Wright) estimated the total killed to be between 40 and 50.” Wright was ultimately arrested for his crimes, primarily due to the outrage of Jackson, but the murdering captain in the end managed to escape, disappearing into Spanish-occupied Florida, according to accounts from The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

Price: $75.00

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