Manual of Instruction For the Volunteers and Militia of the United States. instructor of tactics, Commandant of Cadets of the Virginia Military Institute.
Manual of Instruction For the Volunteers and Militia of the United States
Manual of Instruction For the Volunteers and Militia of the United States
Manual of Instruction For the Volunteers and Militia of the United States

Manual of Instruction For the Volunteers and Militia of the United States

Philadelphia: Charles Desilver, 1861.

Hardcover. Octavo. [1], xxvi, 27-743 pages, [1] page blank, [24] pages advertisements, [1]. Illustrated with 176 numbered figures some folding; plates, tables, 13 forms many folding, and music. Brown diamond cloth hardcover with faded gilt illustration on the front board. The spine is missing. Light edge wear to the boards. Contents are shaken with some of the stitching visible in the gutters (no loose pages). The front cover is loose but still attached. The rear cover is secure. Brown staining (ink, oil?) to the gutters of the first 25 pages. On the front paste down is a clipped Georgia Executive Department printed instruction that reads - "Executive Department, Adjutant General's Office, Feb'y 1, 1861. Gilham's Manual for Volunteers and Militia having been approved by the Commander-In-Chief, he orders that it be issued to the Volunteers and Militia of the State of Georgia for their government, and that it be strictly adhered to. Nothing contrary to the tenor of this Manual will be enjoined, or permitted, in any part of the forces of the State of Georgia by any commander, be his rank what it may. [printed name] Henry C. Wayne, Adjutant Gen'l." On the right front flyleaf is an inscription by a Confederate officer - "Lt W L Davis Co. B 6th Rigt (Regt) G M (Georgia Militia) Rocky Plains Newton Co. Ga." Above the soldiers inscription, written in old ink, is "567 Dist Co. G. M." Fair. Item #18910

An Ancestry dot com record for the name Lt. W. L. Davis, Rocky Plains, Newton County, Georgia turned up a Capt. Wilson L. Davis of the 47th Georgia Regiment. The record indicates Capt. Davis, from Newton County, mustered in the 47th Ga. Regt. on March 8th, 1862. An image from the Georgia Civil War Muster Rolls 1860-1864, page 16 (of 25), lists Capt. Wilson L. Davis name directly under the section - "567 District".

From wikipedia: The 6th Georgia Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. It was organized at Macon, Georgia, in April 1861. Future governor of Georgia, Alfred H. Colquitt, was elected its first colonel. The regiment fought in the Battle of Fredericksburg, the Battle of Antietam and participated in Stonewall Jackson's flank attack at the Battle of Chancellorsville. The unit later saw action at battery Wagner near Charleston, South Carolina, and the battle of Olustee near Ocean Pond, Florida. The remnants and survivors of the regiment surrendered at Greenboro, North Carolina on April 26, 1865, to forces under the command of William T. Sherman.

Also from wikipedia: Henry Constantine Wayne (September 18, 1815 – March 15, 1883) was a United States Army officer, and is known for his commanding the expedition to test the U.S. Camel Corps as part of Secretary of War Jefferson Davis's plan to use camels as a transport in the West. Wayne was also a Confederate adjutant and inspector-general for Georgia and a brigadier general during the American Civil War.

[During the Civil War]...Wayne resigned his commission after receiving the results of Abraham Lincoln's victory in the presidential election. He joined the Confederate Army and was appointed the adjutant and inspector-general of Georgia by Governor Joseph E. Brown,[3] where he was responsible for putting the army of Georgia into order in companies, regiments, and brigades. He also commanded Georgia's Quartermaster General, Ira Roe Foster, to immediately provide supplies for the troops, instructing Foster to "proceed personally, or by duly accredited agents, into all parts of the state, and buy 25,000 suits of clothes and 25,000 pairs of shoes[6] for the destitute Ga. troops in the Confederate service."[7] On December 16, 1861, Wayne was commissioned a brigadier general.[3] Through his orders, the men of Georgia guarded the crossings of Chattahoochee River. After being ordered to Manassas, Virginia, Wayne resigned his commission as a brigadier general and he instead just stuck to his duties as adjutant and inspector-general until the end of the war. Although, he did briefly see action during the Savannah Campaign (Sherman's March to the Sea). He commanded Confederate troops at the Battle of Ball's Ferry November 23–26, 1864. In this action, he was unsuccessful in stopping Union forces from crossing the Oconee River in Wilkinson County, GA.[3][8].

Price: $500.00