History of the Old Cheraws. Right Rev. Alexander D. D. Gregg.
History of the Old Cheraws
History of the Old Cheraws
History of the Old Cheraws

History of the Old Cheraws

Containing An Account of the Aborigines of the Pedee, The First White Settlements, Their Subsequent Progress, Civil Changes, the Struggle of the Revolution, and Growth of the Country Afterward; Extending from About A.D. 1730-1810, with Notices of Families and Sketches of Individuals New York: Richardson and Company, 1867.

First Edition. Hardcover. Octavo. viii, 546 pages, [1]. Illustrated with frontispiece map and three other maps. Restored. Brown cloth hardcover with blind stamped decorated borders on the covers. Entire original cloth spine rebacked onto newer cloth. A cut out photograph of Gregg pasted on the yellow front paste down. Front hinge glued. The title page is detached. Old tape repairs to the lower edge of the first 22 pages. Some browning to the lower edges of the text. A few pencil notes on a couple of pages. The second map is crudely taped with part of the map missing. A fair copy.

Howes G 399; Field 627. Fair. Item #17040

From wikipedia:

The Cheraw people, also known as the Saraw or Saura,[1] were a Siouan-speaking tribe of indigenous people of the Southeastern Woodlands,[1] in the Piedmont area of North Carolina near the Sauratown Mountains, east of Pilot Mountain and north of the Yadkin River. They lived in villages near the Catawba River.[2] Their first European and African contact was with the Hernando De Soto Expedition in 1540. The early explorer John Lawson included them in the larger eastern-Siouan confederacy, which he called "the Esaw Nation."[3]

After attacks in the late 17th century and early 18th century, they moved to the southeast around the Pee Dee River, where the Cheraw name became more widely used. They became extinct as a tribe, although some descendants survived as remnant peoples.

Price: $500.00

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