Speech of Hon. A. P. Butler of South Carolina, on the Bill to Enable the People of Kansas Territory to Form A Constitution and State Government, Preparation to Their Admissions into the Union, Etc. H. P. Butler.
Speech of Hon. A. P. Butler of South Carolina, on the Bill to Enable the People of Kansas Territory to Form A Constitution and State Government, Preparation to Their Admissions into the Union, Etc.

Speech of Hon. A. P. Butler of South Carolina, on the Bill to Enable the People of Kansas Territory to Form A Constitution and State Government, Preparation to Their Admissions into the Union, Etc.

Delivered in the United States Senate, June 12, 1856 Washington DC: Printed at the Union Office, 1856.

First Edition. Wraps. Disbound wraps. Approx. 9" x 6". Front and rear covers are blank. Front blank wrap detached. Andrew Butler, 1796-1857, was a strong advocate of slavery and its expansion into Kansas. Very good condition. 13 copies located in OCLC. Very good. Item #15691

From wikipedia: Butler was co-author with Stephen A. Douglas of the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854. This act provided for westward expansion, but in order to gain Southern support, it repealed the Compromise of 1820 by allowing voting residents of new states the right to choose on allowing slavery. Butler's Senate career is noted for an event at which he was not present. Senator Charles Sumner of Massachusetts, during his "Crime Against Kansas" speech in May 1856, denigrated South Carolina and abused Butler personally in terms considered to exceed parliamentary propriety. Sumner likened Butler to Don Quixote and said Butler: "has chosen a mistress to whom he has made his vows, and who, though ugly to others, is always lovely to him; though polluted in the sight of the world, is chaste in his sight. I mean the harlot, Slavery." Senator Stephen Douglas, who was also a subject of criticism during the speech, suggested to a colleague while Sumner was orating that "this damn fool [Sumner] is going to get himself shot by some other damn fool."[2]

South Carolina Congressman Preston Brooks, the second cousin of Butler, considered Sumner's speech an attack on his family honor. Two days after the speech, Brooks brutally beat Sumner on the Senate floor with a gutta-percha cane while fellow South Carolina Rep. Laurence Keitt brandished a pistol to prevent other senators from intervening, even as Sumner lay defenseless on the floor and Brooks continued to beat him. Butler later remarked that if present during the speech, he would have called Sumner to order, hoping to prevent further offense.[citation needed].

Price: $250.00

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